In Vaucluse, where he spent his childhood summers, architect Timothee Mercier converts a dilapidated farmhouse into a minimalist home.

Architect Timothee Mercier of Studio XM converted a crumbling farmhouse into a residence for his parents.

The region of Vaucluse—known for its small villages, lavender fields, truffles, and wine—is the pinnacle of southern French charm. And here, on a meadow at the base of a small, tree-covered hill, is where architect Timothee Mercier of Studio XM’s family has summered since the early 2000s.

“At the time, a small farmhouse sitting in the forest nearby had been weathering away for more than a decade,” he remembers. “It stood on its hill, fading comfortably into the landscape…it was still soft in its ruinous state, a reminder of the qualities of its surroundings.”

Architect Timothee Mercier of Studio XM converted a crumbling farmhouse into a residence for his parents.

Architect Timothee Mercier of Studio XM converted a crumbling farmhouse into a residence for his parents. 

Photo by Simone Bossi

When his parents approached him to create a new home out of the faded structure, Timothee gladly accepted: “It was very special for me to be working somewhere I had spent most of my summers as a child. I knew the grounds well, and I visited the construction site many times.”

"15% of those stones are from the original house," says Timothee. "We dismantled the existing structure looking out for those rare elements, which were then added to the masonry once the foundations were poured."

“15% of those stones are from the original house,” says Timothee. “We dismantled the existing structure looking out for those rare elements, which were then added to the masonry once the foundations were poured.”

Photo by Simone Bossi

When his parents approached him to create a new home out of the faded structure, Timothee gladly accepted: “It was very special for me to be working somewhere I had spent most of my summers as a child. I knew the grounds well, and I visited the construction site many times.” 

"When summer comes around, it gets progressively nestled in the forest, without ever losing views of the vineyard below," says Timothee.

“When summer comes around, it gets progressively nestled in the forest, without ever losing views of the vineyard below,” says Timothee.

Photo by Simone Bossi

See the full story on Dwell.com: An Architect Turns a Weathered French Farmhouse Into a Monastic Retreat for His Parents